Food retailers misuse Australian Farmer’s Logo

ANIKA MCMAHON

Photo_ Plenty Cafe - Fassifern Valley Produce -

Local communities are encouraged to support their local farmers. SourcePlenty

 

Hospitality and food retailers have been accused of misusing the “Australian Farmers” logo in an attempt to increase their own sales.

Fair food organisation, FoodConnect has been working to uncover false claims by companies who are taking advantage of the status that the Australian Farmers logo attracts.

Photo_ Plenty Cafe - Fassifern Valley Produce (2)

Fassifern Valley Produce. Photo: Plenty

Executive Director of FoodConnect Robert Perkin said that it was disappointing to find local cafes and restaurants using the names of local farmers in their marketing, without using their produce.

“There are some restaurants and cafes out of there that are basically spinning a message in their advertising that doesn’t hold true,” Mr Pekin said.

“So they use a farmer for a couple of weeks or us [Foodconnect], and then don’t use them anymore, and all it is, is just to use our name and leverage off our name without using our produce,” he said.

The Australian Farmer’s Market Association (AFMA) is providing an alternate route to local produce through farmers markets.

“The vision is essentially to promote best practice farmers markets Australia wide, which then have very powerful benefits for the host communities,” they said.

“So they can help local economic development, they can educate people, [and] they can re-invigorate community spaces.”

AFMA has developed model rules for new start farmers to make trading sustainable.

“We are more than willing to talk with them, if they’ve got a market and they think they need to do something to tweak it, we are very happy to help people, that’s what we are there for.

Plenty‘ cafe in West End, Brisbane is leading the way with sourcing local produce.

Manager of Plenty Sara May, reveals the exciting possibility of sourcing locally and making a difference in your community.

“Our owner Karen Hodges, started the business with the view to create a place… focusing on the relationship between farmer and consumer,” she said. 

“So much about the food industry is about having a conversation with people, and it’s really interesting when you do that, how understanding and accommodating and open people are, to letting you guide their experience.”

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